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Digital Photography for the Genealogist–Introduction

Posted on Jan 16, 2012

This entry is part 1 of 7 in the series Digital Photography for the Genealogist

 

A digital camera can be one of your most valued genealogical research tools. A digital camera allows you to effectively acquire records and preserve documents, cut your reproduction costs by a minimum of 50%, and achieve three times more with your available time. Learning how to preserve, catalog, and file images for easy access is also a great benefit.

 

As I have sought to learn about my ancestors, I’ve been fortunate to travel to some of the areas where my ancestors lived. I have had the opportunity to do on-site research at local courthouses, libraries, genealogical societies, family cemeteries, and long-ago home sites—as well as meet new “cousins.”

 

These experiences have ranged from half-day excursions to a

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Labels: photography

Desired features when choosing a digital camera

Posted on Jan 16, 2012

This entry is part 2 of 7 in the series Digital Photography for the Genealogist

 

Are you ready to buy a digital camera?  The following are recommendations (specifications for digital camera) that will fit the needs of most genealogists:

 

Match megapixels to your use:  Most point-and-shoot cameras offer at least 4 megapixels, which is plenty for producing 8-by-10-inch prints. Cameras with more megapixels will yield even larger prints, and allow you to blow up a part of an image with less likelihood that the print will be blurry. If you plan to make only 4-by-6-inch prints, you don’t have to shoot at the camera’s highest resolution–and as a result, you can fit more shots on your memory card.

 

Look for rechargeable batteries and a charger: The cost of disposable batteries adds up over the long r

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Labels: photography