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Barry's Relatively Speaking: A Serendipitous Relationship

Posted on Dec 31, 2012

Barry's Relatively Speaking shares the personal experiences and stories of genealogists found in the Everton Genealogical Helper Magazine collection on MyGenShare.com. Carol shares the following experience.

It will soon be fifteen years since I met Elizabeth Spelman. Our friendship was important to both of us, and when she mentioned that her father's middle name was Munson, I was intrigued. I told her my mother's maiden name was Munson, thinking we might be somehow related. She brushed aside my interest, explaining that the middle name is a common one for men in her family, having been used since the eighteenth century out of respect for a man who befriended one of her ancestors, but who was not related.

The matter was dropped until this past year when I became actively involved in tracing my lineage, and obtained the two volumes of The Munson Record. This spar

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Barry's Relatively Speaking: Remarkable Patience

Posted on Dec 30, 2012

Barry's Relatively Speaking shares the personal experiences and stories of genealogists found in the Everton Genealogical Helper Magazine collection on MyGenShare.com. Vivian shares the following experience.

Jonathan Fletcher and his spouse Rebecca (Cory) Fletcher moved up to Richford, Vermont, as the town was being settled in the early eighteen hundreds, from Chelmsford, Massachusetts. With them was their then small family and scanty possessions, perhaps as many Revolutionary War soldiers, he had been there previously and thought it a desirable area to make his "pitch" or maybe he just kept going as far as he could and still be in the states. At any rate, he stayed for his lifetime, and to this day some of his progenitors still reside in that small Canadian border town.

The legend that came down to me from a sister to my grandmother went as follows - "One spring d

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Barry's Relatively Speaking: Fishing Story

Posted on Dec 29, 2012

Barry's Relatively Speaking shares the personal experiences and stories of genealogists found in the Everton Genealogical Helper Magazine collection on MyGenShare.com. Rosemary shares the following experience.

While our whole family was on vacation at a favorite spot, Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri, our oldest son clipped an article about a "catch and release" fishing regulation at the lake which he found in the advertising and entertainment newspaper we had picked up. He gave the clipping to our youngest son who put it in the tackle box.

Several months later I was driving our youngest son and a neighbor boy to a nearby lake for some fishing when I heard from the back seat, "Who is Josiah Riffle?" I haven't the faintest idea, why do you ask?", I replied to the neighbor. "Because I'm reading about him right here," he said.

On the flip side of the fishing article was

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Barry's Relatively Speaking: One Hundred Bushels of Corn per Yard ?

Posted on Dec 28, 2012

Barry's Relatively Speaking shares the personal experiences and stories of genealogists found in the Everton Genealogical Helper Magazine collection on MyGenShare.com. Phoebe shares the following experience.

Those of us who are so worldly minded as to love good clothes are glad we did not live in some of the central parts of this state in the early days when a yard of silk would cost as much money as eighty bushels of corn would sell for, or calico was exchanged at the rate of one yard for eight bushels of corn while good broadcloth commanded one hundred bushels of corn per yard. No wonder the women spent so much time weaving cotton and woolen cloth.

Change was not plentiful, and cut silver was used - a dollar cut into four pieces for quarters, or eight pieces for bits. The currency question was troublesome in those days: money which would "pass" in New

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Barry's Relatively Speaking: Thirteenth Generation Brother

Posted on Dec 27, 2012

Barry's Relatively Speaking shares the personal experiences and stories of genealogists found in the Everton Genealogical Helper Magazine collection on MyGenShare.com. Marlene shares the following experience.

My parents, George and Norma (Jersey) Eastway, were poor dirt farmers after losing their farm to the 1932 depression. When I was 3 years old, my parents got an 11 year old boy to live with them for a home, to help Dad with the chores. This boy, Charles Dennison, had lost his parents. Chuck stayed with us for a while and finally left to seek his place in the world, but he always remembered the lady who gave him love that he needed and the man who showed him kindness and a small girl who worshipped him, thinking of him only as her "brother."

Through the years we moved around, but Chuck, even after he married and lived about 200 miles from us, visited often.

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